What Was Missing This Fall?

The end of the year is often a time for reflection. Some of you may be ending the term and thinking about the project that got away–the manuscript you were meaning to finish or a class you want to improve. We hope you will have a look at the preliminary slate of Spring offerings from FDEV and find something that connects to a professional goal in your life. We are going to start fast in the Spring. Applications will be live for most programs on 1/18 with a due date of 1/30 so we wanted to preview the slate for you now. 

Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$)
Lead: Beth Shook 
Compensation: $500
Format: Asynchronous online

Want to decrease course costs for students? And at the same time provide students high quality and accessible course materials? Participate in an asynchronous Canvas training designed to help faculty identify and evaluate Open Educational Resources (OER) and other free or affordable course materials for your courses. Faculty who complete the online training, including developing a cost-savings plan to be implemented in a Fall 2024 or Spring 2025 course, will earn $500 in taxable income. 

Canvas modules will cover the following topics: OER and why they are important, finding and evaluating OER, Library resources, understanding copyright and Creative Commons licenses, ensuring accessibility, curating and adapting materials for your course, teaching with open resources, and the Zero Cost Course Materials (ZCCM) designation.

Advancing Hispanic/Latinx Student Success
Leads: Yvette Zuniga and Teresita Curiel
Compensation: TBD $500-$1000
Format: TBD

This project is partially funded by a generous U.S. Department of Education Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) grant from PI Ryan Patten, College of BSS. We are happy to collaborate on this important work. This FLC will feature connected workshops focused on better understanding Hispanic/Latinx university students and how Chico State can advance their success.

BIPoC Writing Community 
Leads: Stef Baldivia and Gloria Lopez
Compensation: TBD, at least $500
Format: TBD

The purpose of the Black, Indigenous, People of Color Faculty Writing Community (BIPoC-FWC) is to cultivate community and support for a diverse group of faculty to successfully navigate the retention, tenure, and promotion process, by developing scholarly and creative work, while strengthening a network of colleagues at the Chico State campus. The BIPoC-FWC is designed to create a space for BIPoC faculty to share their research ideas and publication goals, while supporting and motivating each other. All self-identified Black, Indigenous, or Faculty of Color, are encouraged to apply. Members will regularly meet in a set location for a total of ten 90-minute sessions and two community building events. During writing sessions, every writer works on their own project, with mutual support offered through fellowship both prior to and following the writing sessions. Faculty will be working in a large cohort led by two peer-mentors, Gloria Lopez and Stef Baldivia. There will be a mandatory kick-off meeting in early spring based on participants availability.

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Teaching (EDIT)
Leads: Alisa Wade and Allison McConnell
Compensation: $500 for attending the majority of the workshops
Format: FLEX

The Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Teaching (EDIT) Series includes six workshops, and is designed to offer faculty an introduction to basic concepts of equity, diversity, inclusion, and how they can be implemented in the classroom in order to create more equitable and accessible learning environments. Each workshop explores–and models–a different facet of student-centered and inclusive teaching through tools, resources, and strategies: positionality in the classroom, antiracist pedagogy, backward design, accessibility of course materials, culturally responsive teaching and the hidden curriculum, and practices of classroom community building. Workshops are each paired with a teaching guide (and other materials) and offer the opportunity for faculty to complete deliverables that they will be able to incorporate into their course(s) moving forward.

Grant Writing Support
In Development
Compensation: TBD

Leadership Development
Lead: Holly Nevarez
Compensation: $500
Format: TBD

The leadership development faculty learning community (FLC) will introduce leadership styles and strategies. This FLC is designed for you lead from wherever you are. Perhaps you are not a formal leader on campus, but find yourself leading other staff or students; perhaps you would like to be a formal leader someday and want to start to develop skills; or perhaps you are going to be a department Chair next year and want to start preparing. In any of those scenarios, this FLC is for you. We will talk about staffing, shared governance, facilitating meetings, managing difficult people, work to develop a leadership philosophy and more.

Publish and Flourish
Lead: Chris Fosen
Compensation: $500
Format: One online synchronous FLC and one in-person FLC

The Office of Faculty Development is bringing back faculty learning community (FLC) writing groups for the spring 2024 semester. After a survey was sent out in December 2023 to “Publish and Flourish” and “Write an Article in Twelve Weeks” participants about meeting preferences, we recognized the need for two distinct meeting patterns and goals for FLC participants. Faculty can select either option below:

  • Meeting one hour a week on Zoom for dedicated writing time with minimal interruption, for the purposes of getting words down on paper and providing mutual accountability.
  • Meeting two hours every other week in-person (flex possible) for time to reflect on their writing process, plan out benchmarks for completion, and share drafts in small groups of 2-4. These groups provide accountability and increased understanding of how writing time can mesh with other professional duties.

Participating faculty will receive $500 in taxable income for completing some significant portion of their writing goals, and attending all meetings (through week 13 or 14).

Teaching Climate Change & Resilience (TCCR)
Lead: Mark Stemen
Compensation: $500
Format: Online synchronous and asynchronous
Applications due on 12/15

Faculty participating in the TCCR FLC will learn from experts in the field about the science behind climate change, the solutions available to counter it, the need to incorporate justice into the conversation and the enormous anxiety all of this produces in our students. The five 90-minute sessions spread evenly throughout the semester will be held over Zoom, allowing faculty to form breakout rooms based on discipline for further discussion and curriculum development. In addition to changing their own courses, participating faculty will also become part of the systemwide network of colleagues focused on issues of climate change that formed after the first FLC, and learn how other faculty incorporate those issues across a wide spectrum of curricular disciplines.

Quality Learning and Teaching (QLT)
Lead: Allison McConnell
Compensation: $750
Format: Asynchronous online

The Quality Learning and Teaching (QLT) Program is an asynchronous, self-paced Canvas course structured around the QLT evaluation rubric. This QLT course is designed to meet core standards in the QLT instrument through the completion of eight modules with associated deliverables that guide you to fully redesign a course (or design a new course). Topics and deliverables focus on backwards design, student engagement, authentic assessment, inclusion and accessibility, and more. This QLT course requires a final course review. While focusing on online learning, QLT provides a framework that is applicable to all modes of instruction.

Finally, if you find yourself with time and an inclination toward professional development in the next few weeks, remember we have developed a 100% online and asynchronous course to help you redesign your classes in a world of generative AI. We also have our institutional subscription to the NCFDD with a variety of great resources. Or you could just get some rest–up to you!

Zach Justus
Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

Universal Design for Learning: You Are on Your Way Already!

The main portion of this tip is brought to you by Dr. Jamie Gunderson from the School of Education and a READI Equity Fellow through Faculty Development.

Here’s an interesting insight – chances are you’re already incorporating Universal Design for Learning (UDL) into your teaching methods, even if you’re not consciously aware of it. What is UDL? UDL is an educational framework that aims to create inclusive and flexible learning environments by providing learners with options to engage, represent, and express learning. How am I already implementing UDL? Well, consider if you incorporate peer discussions or collaborative group activities in your lessons. These practices promote collaboration and a sense of community, in line with UDL Checkpoint 8.3. Are you using tools like Canvas or other technologies to share information, interact with your learners, or enhance their engagement? This is a form of using multimedia for communication, as outlined in UDL Checkpoint 5.1. The UDL framework encourages us to reflect on how our existing teaching methods align with UDL’s principles, guidelines, and checkpoints to support all learners.

Another aspect of UDL that I find particularly appealing is its commitment to evidence-based continuous improvement. Did you know that the UDL principles, guidelines, and checkpoints are regularly reviewed, revised, and updated based on ongoing research and feedback from practitioners? Currently, there is a strong emphasis on enhancing equity, diversity, and inclusion, which you can explore further by looking into the UDL Rising to Equity initiative. As soon as the updated framework becomes available, I’ll make sure to share it with our campus community. In the meantime, I encourage you to kickstart or continue your journey towards UDL and equity, diversity, and inclusion by exploring the abundant resources on the Instruction page of the READI Hub, a repository sponsored by the Office of Faculty Development. You’re likely to discover numerous strategies and ideas that will benefit your teaching practices and some that you may already be implementing – kudos! 

For more tips, and resources, or to geek out on all things UDL, please contact Jamie Linn Gunderson at jlgunderson@csuchico.edu.

Additionally, we in FDEV want to highlight another great resource from the NCFDD library. We spend a lot of time as tenure-track faculty working towards tenure and promotion, but not enough time thinking about what happens when you get there. Last Spring NCFDD hosted two panel discussions on what happens after earning tenure and one on promotion to full professor. You have to sign up for NCFDD (which you have free access to for this year), but once you do you will have access to an incredible catalog of useful resources for your classroom and professional development. 

Last thing, remember we have a host of opportunities for faculty this Winter and into Spring. Check them out and find something that will help you.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

Teaching Climate Change & Resilience

The main portion of this tip is brought to you by Dr. Mark Stemen, from Geography and Planning.

Over Spring 2022, 65 CSU faculty redesigned over 75 courses to include greater engagement of climate change and resilience, immediately affecting the education of thousands of students across the CSU the following year, including over 900 students on our campus alone. 

The CSU Teaching Climate Change & Resilience (TCCR) Faculty Learning Community (FLC) was first offered in Spring 2022 through the Office of Faculty Development

Since then, the FLC has been featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education and has received the Campus Sustainability Achievement Award by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), and most recently received recognition from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities

In Spring 2024 the FLC will be offered again, with the support of Chico State’s Office of the President, the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, and the Office of the Chancellor’s Innovative Teaching & Learning Programs. The FLC will be open to all 23 CSU campuses and aligns with the California State University Sustainability Policy, which “is intended to position the nation’s largest university system as a leader in the teaching and use of applied research to educate climate literate students.” 

This FLC is designed with busy and burdened faculty in mind. The five sessions are only 90 minutes long, and each will help faculty step by step to easily incorporate climate change and resilience into a course they teach. Our goal is to connect faculty with a broad range of approaches and ideas, as well as resources that are well-researched, relevant, and relatable to their discipline; lots of resources.  

The five Zoom sessions on Tuesdays from 9:00-10:30 a.m. 

This FLC also offers the rare opportunity to connect with colleagues across the system. The FLC will be entirely over Zoom, allowing us to organize breakout rooms based on discipline. We found when we used disciplinary breakout rooms, the sessions became more productive and transformative for faculty.  As one participant remarked, “It felt like the department I always wanted. Everyone believed in climate change and they all wanted to help.” 

The FLC application is due by December 15, 2023. All faculty are welcome to apply.
Additionally, we in FDEV want to point you toward a timely NCFDD resource. Many faculty have been personally impacted by the tragic situation in Israel and Gaza. In addition, many faculty are encountering conversations about this situation in the classroom. In 2020 Dr. Chavella Pittman was featured in a webinar on Preparing for Difficult or Controversial Conversations as part of their Empowered Teaching Toolkit. You have to sign up for NCFDD (which you have free access to for this year), but once you do you will have access to an incredible catalog of useful resources for your classroom and professional development.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

Course Materials…Already?

It is that time of year again! The weather is cooling down and my daughter is changing her mind about a Halloween costume every weekend so it must be…time to select Spring textbooks?

Having the correct course material in place before spring registration in October helps students make course and budget decisions. Reporting your course materials is critical even if you are using library or open educational resources (OER).

Do you know what classes you are teaching?

Are you planning on using the same materials you did last time?

If you answered “yes” to both of these questions you can finish this process in five minutes. Use the Canvas “Account” menu option in the upper left, and then click “Follett Discover”, or you can email your course materials list to wildcatstore@csuchico.edu, and you will be done in a flash.

I know many part-time faculty will not have specific sections yet and schedules can change. However, this is a critical issue for students as they make decisions and early reporting also allows the bookstore time to find lower-priced used materials. I encourage you to consider a department or program-level conversation about selecting predictable materials for classes so the Department Chair can make selections for courses yet to be assigned. 

Speaking of textbooks, if you are looking to find or develop a quality resource to lower costs for students, that also increases the likelihood they will have the materials and read for your class, be on the lookout for our CAL$ application later this fall.  The CAL$ program will run during the Spring semester.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

Get Some Help

Being a University professor is awesome. You have specialized knowledge, education, and experience that makes you a valuable mentor and resource for students. Part of this dynamic is that we are used to being the most knowledgeable person in the room so asking for help can be tough, even humbling. I am here to tell you it is worth your time. 

A few years ago I was coordinating a large course on campus and noticed some numbers I did not like in terms of successful student completion of the course and equity gaps (if you have not already done so take a minute to click on the link above to check out your own courses). I have been teaching for a long time, but I realized I needed some help so I applied for the 2021 Faculty Learning Community about equity gaps. It was an amazing experience and I learned a ton from speakers, leaders, and from colleagues grappling with the same questions. 

On Monday we published our slate of programming along with partners from Undergraduate Education and International Education. Take a look and see if there is somewhere you could use a little extra help. Your love for learning and your discipline is probably what brought you to this point–keep it going and apply for a Fall 2023 Faculty Learning Community.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences

Resources and Support for Neurodiversity

Sent on behalf of Dr. A. Josephine Blagrave, Associate Professor of Kinesiology and READI Equity Fellow

As we continue to improve access, equity and a sense of belonging for our students, and work to improve student retention, it is important to include our students with disabilities. Previous resources from FDEV include a teaching guide and a podcast on neurodiversity in higher education and the work Jaime Gunderson is engaging in with Universal Design for Learning. Helping our disabled and neurodivergent students, faculty and staff connect and engage with each other in shared community is important. Here are some new resources that are currently available or coming soon to improve connections and support.

Neurodiversity and Disability Symposium (September 23, 2022): Formerly the Northern California Autism Symposium, this year’s keynotes include Steve Silberman and Alycia Anderson.  

Neurodiversity Student Club  

Chico State Neurodiverse club is established to support students who identify as neurodivergent and their allies, through networking, educational activities, and events. This student group will work with the Chico State Neurodiverse Task Force, to help improve student success and support for neurodivergent students at California State University, Chico. The purpose of this club is to allow all neurodiverse students and allies to engage in social activities that help build a sense of belonging and community. Additionally, this club will host group discussions on several topics within their college career and adult life. Outside the school, the club will engage in helping neurodiverse campus and community members by participating in several events throughout the year.  

Chico Autism Spectrum Empowerment (CASE): open to all CSUC students who identify as being on the autism spectrum.  “Let’s Talk About…” sessions are held the second and fourth Mondays of each month starting at 4:00pm.  This semester’s topics include Career Preparation, Communicating with Faculty, Choosing a Major/Courses, ASD and Accommodations, etc.  Additionally, each session will provide time for open discussion regarding topics of interest related to being on the autism spectrum.  Students that are interested in getting more information can contact Terry Quinto at Accessibility Resource Center (ARC) 530 898-5959. 

Wellcat Counseling Center, ADHD Support Group: Going through college with ADHD can be challenging at best! Learn how to work with your brain’s natural strengths and get support around its obstacles. This group is designed to be a comfortable space to unmask, share some skills, gain psychoeducation about ADHD, and have some comfort in a chaotic world. Feel free to bring lunch, fidgets, drinks, and wear comfortable clothing for floor sitting if you choose! Clients do not need a formal diagnosis to be eligible to participate in the support group. All genders and types of students are welcome. 

Neurodiversity Task Force (Faculty & Staff): in Fall 2021, President Hutchinson established a Neurodiversity Taskforce to explore ways to raise awareness and acceptance and to better serve neurodivergent members of the campus community. This group continues to meet and partner with other programs on campus to improve supports, services and community for our neurodivergent students.  

Neurodiversity and Disability Affinity Group (coming soon!) 

Teaching Climate Change & Sustainability

Dear faculty, 

In an attempt to continue supporting efforts towards climate change and resilience, we are partnering this year with Jennifer Rotnem, Director of Energy & Sustainability, to approach these conversations from different and more diverse perspectives. Leading these efforts and conversations is once again Dr. Mark Stemen, who has been a tireless champion in advancing timely and challenging discussions about climate change and environmental justice. Mark is serving as Sustainability and Climate Change Faculty Fellow, collaborating with both our units. 

On behalf of this team, I want to share three main updates: 

  1. A number of resources are available to you on the Teaching Climate Change & Resilience Page. Here you can access books, resources on curriculum design and instruction, and be informed about upcoming events. 
  2. Speaking of events! Mark your calendars for Dr. Britt Wray’s visit on October 13th, 6:00 p.m at ARTS Recital Hall. Dr. Britt Wray is a Human and Planetary Health Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health, and her expertise includes studying the impact of climate change on mental health, especially on the younger generations. She is the author of Generation Dread: Finding Purpose in an Age of Climate Crisis. She has recorded a video for us that is available on the page linked above. 
  3. Lastly, be on the lookout for announcements and communication about opportunities to come together to discuss sustainability and climate change. We look forward to having a dynamic group of faculty join us! If you are interested in participating in these conversations, please let us know! 

We look forward to expanding awareness about sustainability across the campus! 

Showcase evidence of teaching excellence

Dear faculty,

As we get closer to the due date for turning in your dossier (February 18th), I want to take a moment to re-share some resources available in FDEV for retention, tenure, and promotion (RTP), and more general resources that can help with your dossiers (whether you are a T/TT faculty or a lecturer). Earlier this year and last year we offered a number of Friday Forums that provided insights into a variety of topics pertaining to RTP, how to write your dossier, and how to showcase evidence of your work.

I want to share the recordings from those forums, and I hope that you can find valuable information:

  1. How to Showcase Evidence of Teaching Excellence (Class Evaluations) – additional material available here
  2. How to Showcase Evidence of Teaching Excellence (in the RTP Dossier) – additional material available here
  3. How to Prepare for a Class Peer Evaluation – slides available here
  4. How to Approach Service Strategically (and write about it in your dossier)- slides and additional material available here
  5. Resources on RTP

I hope these resources will be useful and I want to encourage all faculty to reach out to Faculty Development for questions about RTP, dossier writing, class evaluations, etc. We might not have all the answers, but we should be able to point you in the right direction. I am also happy to share my dossier with anybody who would like to see an example, just reach out to me!

Comment on our blog if you want to share different ideas on how to showcase evidence of teaching excellence in your dossier.

The BCCER Beckons

This Tuesday Tip is brought to you by Gary Day and Eli Goodsell

As you prepare for the upcoming spring semester, don’t forget that the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER) is here for you! Now the largest ecological reserve in the CSU system, and second overall amongst all California universities, the BCCER can be your destination for all field trips, research activities, case studies, and more!

The BCCER serves as a learning laboratory for every college on campus, providing space, resources, and knowledgeable staff for all excursions. Whether it be scientific research, experiential learning, creative inspiration, retreats, or recreation, the BCCER is campus’ backyard!

What the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve can provide for you:

  • Year-round access
  • 14 miles from campus
  • 7,835 acres of diverse habitat
  • 4.5 miles of Big Chico Creek
  • Campus’ high-speed internet (Eduroam) on site
  • Parking to accommodate any size class/event
  • Transportation on grounds provided
  • Meeting space
  • Knowledgeable staff

Reach out to the BCCER staff to find out how the BCCER can best serve you!
(530) 342-1371
bccer@csuchico.edu

Learn more about the BCCER at www.csuchico.edu/bccer. Be sure to follow us on social media to stay up to date on all the things we’re up to:
Facebook – @bigchicocreekecologicalreserve
Instagram – @csuc_reserves

Share your experience in a comment if you have visited the BCCER with your students!