The Legacy of the Research in Equity, Antiracism, Diversity, and Inclusion (READI) Hub

FDEV Faculty Fellow Dr. Jamie Gunderson sat down with Dr. Alisa Wade and former director Dr. Chiara Ferrari to discuss the history and impact of READI at Chico State in our most recent episode of the Rise, Teach, Learn podcast. Listening to it compelled me to reflect on the impact this hub has had and will continue to have on Chico State. READI was the vision of my dear friend and predecessor Chiara Ferrari who worked with a group of diverse faculty fellows to make the values of the institution a reality within Faculty Development. The funding for the hub ends this Spring, but I want to highlight a few enduring products of the READI hub that will impact our campus for years. 

First, Faculty Development offers 60+ unique Teaching Guides covering a wide range of topics from Black Lives Matter in the Classroom to Gamification. The fellows utilized a universal design for learning framework with an equity emphasis to produce what is now a library of resources. This collection is permanent and we will continue to maintain it moving forward. 

Second, later this semester we will launch a Canvas-based Teaching Certificate program designed to help faculty elevate their teaching practices and provide RTP-friendly verification of completion. 

Third, the READI hub supported an incredible range of faculty programs. This semester we were thrilled to pilot the BIPoC faculty writing group, co-produce programming related to the Book In Common,  and continue supporting the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Teaching workshops. 

I hope you will join me in an enthusiastic thank-you to Chiara, the FDEV staff, and the many READI partners who made this work happen. In doing so we can be thankful for what we have while working to expand the lessons we have learned through partnership and creativity.

Zach Justus
Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

Welcome Back!

The start of the semester often brings excitement and uncertainty for us and our students. This semester that uncertainty was compounded by the strike. Given the rapid adjustments to teaching and learning schedules I am writing to urge you to give yourselves, each other, and your students some extra grace and space to start the semester. 

  • Your normal add/drop policy may require some adjustment if students saw the news of the strike and stayed out of town or picked up extra work shifts. 
  • You may not have your Canvas site as built-out as you normally would because your mind has been elsewhere, it’s okay.
  • Staff support spent their days yesterday fielding questions from confused students and without all the answers. Let’s be extra kind at this time. 

When you do catch your breath, take a moment to consider the robust slate of professional development opportunities we are offering this Spring. All applications are due at 11:59pm on 1/30.

BIPOC Faculty Writing Community (FWC) 
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers who identify as BIPoC
Format: In Person
Compensation: $500
Contact: Stef Baldivia and Gloria Lopez
Full Description
Application

The purpose of the Black, Indigenous, People of Color Faculty Writing Community (BIPoC-FWC) is to cultivate community and support for a diverse group of faculty to successfully navigate the retention, tenure, and promotion process, by developing scholarly and creative work, while strengthening a network of colleagues at the Chico State campus. The BIPoC-FWC is designed to create a space for BIPoC faculty to share their research ideas and publication goals, while supporting and motivating each other. All self-identified Black, Indigenous, or faculty of Color, are encouraged to apply. Members will regularly meet in a set location for a total of ten 90-minute sessions and two community building events. During writing sessions, every writer works on their own project, with mutual support offered through fellowship both prior to and following the writing sessions. Faculty will be working in a large cohort led by two peer-mentors, Gloria Lopez and Stef Baldivia. There will be a mandatory kick-off meeting in early spring based on participants availability.

Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$)
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: Online and Asynchronous
Compensation: $500
Contact: Beth Shook
Full Description
Application

Want to decrease course costs for students? And at the same time provide students high quality and accessible course materials? Participate in an asynchronous Canvas training designed to help faculty identify and evaluate Open Educational Resources (OER) and other free or affordable course materials for your courses. Faculty who complete the online training, including developing a cost-savings plan to be implemented in a Fall 2024 or Spring 2025 course, will earn $500 in taxable income. 

Canvas modules will cover the following topics: OER and why they are important, finding and evaluating OER, Library resources, understanding copyright and Creative Commons licenses, ensuring accessibility, curating and adapting materials for your course, teaching with open resources, and the Zero Cost Course Materials (ZCCM) designation.

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Teaching (EDIT) 
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: Primarily Zoom, with one in person session
Compensation: $500 for attending at least four workshops
Contact: Alisa Wade and Allison McConnell
Full Description
Application

The Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Teaching (EDIT) Series includes six workshops, and is designed to offer faculty an introduction to basic concepts of equity, diversity, inclusion, and how they can be implemented in the classroom in order to create more equitable and accessible learning environments. Each workshop explores–and models–a different facet of student-centered and inclusive teaching through tools, resources, and strategies: positionality in the classroom, antiracist pedagogy, backward design, accessibility of course materials, culturally responsive teaching and the hidden curriculum, and practices of classroom community building. Workshops are each paired with a teaching guide (and other materials) and offer the opportunity for faculty to complete deliverables that they will be able to incorporate into their course(s) moving forward.

Leadership Development 
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers currently in/considering leadership roles on campus
Format: In Person
Compensation: $500
Contact: Holly Nevarez
Full Description
Application

The leadership FLC will introduce leadership styles and strategies. This FLC is designed for people who lead from wherever you are. Perhaps you are not a formal leader on campus, but find yourself leading other staff or students; perhaps you would like to be a formal leader someday and want to start to develop skills; or perhaps you are going to be a department Chair next year and want to start preparing. In any of those scenarios, this FLC is for you. We will talk about staffing, shared governance, facilitating meetings, managing difficult people, work to develop a leadership philosophy and more.

Publish and Flourish 
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: One online FLC and one in person FLC
Compensation: $500
Contact: Chris Fosen
Full Description
Application

The Office of Faculty Development is bringing back faculty writing groups FLCs for the spring 2024 semester. After a survey was sent out in Dec 2023 to “Publish and Flourish” and “Write an Article in Twelve Weeks” participants about meeting preferences, we recognized the need for two distinct meeting patterns and goals for FLC participants. Faculty can select either option below:

  • Meeting one hour a week on Zoom for dedicated writing time with minimal interruption, for the purposes of getting words down on paper and providing mutual accountability.
  • Meeting two hours every other week in MLIB 455 (flex possible) for time to reflect on their writing process, plan out benchmarks for completion, and share drafts in small groups of 2-4. These groups provide accountability and increased understanding of how writing time can mesh with other professional duties.

Participating faculty will receive $500 in taxable income for completing some significant portion of their writing goals, and attending all meetings (through week 13 or 14).

Quality Learning and Teaching (QLT) 
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: Online and Asynchronous
Compensation: $750
Contact: Allison McConnell
Full Description
Application

The Quality Learning and Teaching (QLT) Program is an asynchronous, self-paced Canvas course structured around the QLT evaluation rubric. This QLT course is designed to meet core standards in the QLT instrument through the completion of eight modules with associated deliverables that guide you to fully redesign a course (or design a new course). Topics and deliverables focus on backwards design, student engagement, authentic assessment, inclusion and accessibility, and more. This QLT course requires a final course review. While focusing on online learning, QLT provides a framework that is applicable to all modes of instruction.

Zach Justus
Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

All past Tuesday Tips are curated on the FDEV website.

Universal Design for Learning: You Are on Your Way Already!

The main portion of this tip is brought to you by Dr. Jamie Gunderson from the School of Education and a READI Equity Fellow through Faculty Development.

Here’s an interesting insight – chances are you’re already incorporating Universal Design for Learning (UDL) into your teaching methods, even if you’re not consciously aware of it. What is UDL? UDL is an educational framework that aims to create inclusive and flexible learning environments by providing learners with options to engage, represent, and express learning. How am I already implementing UDL? Well, consider if you incorporate peer discussions or collaborative group activities in your lessons. These practices promote collaboration and a sense of community, in line with UDL Checkpoint 8.3. Are you using tools like Canvas or other technologies to share information, interact with your learners, or enhance their engagement? This is a form of using multimedia for communication, as outlined in UDL Checkpoint 5.1. The UDL framework encourages us to reflect on how our existing teaching methods align with UDL’s principles, guidelines, and checkpoints to support all learners.

Another aspect of UDL that I find particularly appealing is its commitment to evidence-based continuous improvement. Did you know that the UDL principles, guidelines, and checkpoints are regularly reviewed, revised, and updated based on ongoing research and feedback from practitioners? Currently, there is a strong emphasis on enhancing equity, diversity, and inclusion, which you can explore further by looking into the UDL Rising to Equity initiative. As soon as the updated framework becomes available, I’ll make sure to share it with our campus community. In the meantime, I encourage you to kickstart or continue your journey towards UDL and equity, diversity, and inclusion by exploring the abundant resources on the Instruction page of the READI Hub, a repository sponsored by the Office of Faculty Development. You’re likely to discover numerous strategies and ideas that will benefit your teaching practices and some that you may already be implementing – kudos! 

For more tips, and resources, or to geek out on all things UDL, please contact Jamie Linn Gunderson at jlgunderson@csuchico.edu.

Additionally, we in FDEV want to highlight another great resource from the NCFDD library. We spend a lot of time as tenure-track faculty working towards tenure and promotion, but not enough time thinking about what happens when you get there. Last Spring NCFDD hosted two panel discussions on what happens after earning tenure and one on promotion to full professor. You have to sign up for NCFDD (which you have free access to for this year), but once you do you will have access to an incredible catalog of useful resources for your classroom and professional development. 

Last thing, remember we have a host of opportunities for faculty this Winter and into Spring. Check them out and find something that will help you.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

Podcasts and Teaching/Learning

This tip pulls together several recommendations connected by a common theme: podcasting. I love the format of podcasts because it allows me to learn something while I am doing chores or walking the dog. 

First, Dr. Jamie Gunderson from the School of Education has started the fifth season of our own Rise, Teach, Learn podcast. I was happy to join Jamie along with two of my favorite campus colleagues, Assistant Vice President Mary Wallmark and Dean Tracy Butts to discuss Caffeinated Cats – the first Faculty Development housed podcast at Chico State. I hope you enjoy listening to this episode and exploring the wonderful library of work Jamie has created. 

Second, think about exploring podcasting as a tool for teaching and learning. Faculty Development has a whole workshop series on the topic in our archive. This can be an alternative format for student work and for distribution of your own course content. When I teach I often assign podcasts. Students have traditionally responded well to the change of pace. 

Third, I continue to think the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast with Bonni Stachowiak is an industry leader in exploring key topics related to our work in the classroom. She interviews an excellent guest every week and covers nearly every topic related to teaching and learning. Recent episodes on Equity and Social Justice in STEM Education and Assignment Makeovers in the AI Age have been especially good. 

Finally, I want to remind you that we have purchased an institutional membership to the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity. Last week we sent out the simple steps needed to activate your individual membership (look for them below). In each Tuesday Tip I will be trying to highlight a resource or upcoming event through NCFDD. On Thursday of this week they are hosting an interesting webinar on How to Engage in Healthy Conflict hosted by Dr. Ndidiamaka Amutah-Onukagha. It is an area of potential growth for many of us. 

1) Go to http://www.FacultyDiversity.org/Join
2) Choose your institution from the drop-down menu. 
3) Select “Activate my Membership” 
4) Complete the registration form using your institutional email address (i.e. @InstitutionalEmail.edu) 
5) Go to your institution email to find a confirmation email. Click “Activate Account” in the confirmation email.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences
Google Voice/Text: 530-487-4150

Applications for the Initial Slate of FLCs are Due Today

We are trying not to clutter your inbox so we are using this week’s tip to simply remind you that applications for the initial slate of Faculty Learning Communities are due today. There is something here for everyone. 

We are excited to bring you the initial slate of Fall 2023 offerings from FDEV and partners. All applications are live now and are due on Tuesday 9/12 at 11:59pm. Applications will be evaluated by members of the FDEV board or sponsoring units.

This group of programs includes Faculty Development programs and offerings from Undergraduate Education and International Education. We collaborated to try and maximize visibility and accessibility, but we want to be sure those programs receive the credit they deserve. Any questions about the programming broadly should be directed to Interim Director Zach Justus.

Collaborative Online International Education (COIL)
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: Synchronous and Online
Compensation: $500
Length: Fall Semester
Contact: Dr. Nan Li
Full Description
Application 

International Education and Global Engagement (IEGE) is offering an opportunity to participate in a Faculty Learning Community (FLC) this fall to assist professors with the implementation of Collaborative Online International Education (COIL) as a course component on our campus. COIL engages your classes with students across the world in discussion, group projects, and/or problem solving, and professors have the opportunity to collaborate in teaching with colleagues across the world.  

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Teaching (EDIT)
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: In Person
Compensation: $500
Length: Fall Semester
Contact: Dr. Alisa Wade, Allison McConnell, and Zach Justus
Full Description
Application

The Office of Faculty Development (FDEV) in collaboration with the READI Hub will be offering an Equity, Diversity, Inclusion (EDI) Teaching Series in Fall 2023. The series is led by Dr. Alisa Wade (History) in collaboration with Allison McConnell (TLP). The series includes six workshops, and is designed to offer faculty an introduction to basic concepts of equity, diversity, inclusion, and how they can be implemented in the classroom, to create more equitable and accessible learning environments. 

Quality Learning and Teaching (QLT)
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: Asynchronous and Online
Compensation: $750
Length: Fall Semester
Contact: Zach Justus
Full Description
Application

The Office of Faculty Development is partnering with the Technology & Learning Program (TLP) to offer the Quality Learning and Teaching program, which is designed around the QLT evaluation rubric. The course is offered as an asynchronous, self-paced course in Canvas.

STEM Universal Design for Learning (UDL) 
Who: STEM Faculty only (NS and ECC) Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers
Format: Hybrid–all meetings online and in person
Compensation: $1880
Length: Full Academic Year
Contact: Dr. Jamie Linn Gunderson and Zach Justus
Full Description
Application

The Office of Faculty Development is excited to offer an NSF-funded Faculty Learning Community (FLC) focused on the implementation of teaching strategies that support student learning in STEM. 

Supporting Undergraduate Research via Assignment Design
Who: Tenure/Tenure-Track and Lecturers; preference for faculty teaching 100-200 level courses.
Format: in person
Compensation: $250
Length: Three workshop sessions; 2 hours each
Dates: Mondays, Oct 2, 9, & 16 from 9:00-11:00am
Contact: Dr. Kim Jaxon
Application

The Office of Undergraduate Education and Academic Success is offering support for Undergraduate Research. Dr. Kim Jaxon, Coordinator of Undergraduate Research, is leading the workshop series focused on assignment design. These workshop sessions offer an opportunity to design assignments that weave primary research practices into existing courses to support expanded undergraduate research experiences. We know that inviting students to engage in authentic research with faculty is an effective high-impact practice. We also know that mentoring and supporting undergraduate research is time-consuming, often taking place outside the teaching of our courses. We will work with model assignments, design assignments, and support each other as we try out ways to enrich our curriculum with undergraduate research. 

Be on the lookout for additional programs later in the Fall. 

Coming in the Spring
Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$) with Beth Shook
Teaching Climate Change Resilience (TCCR) with Mark Stemen 

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences

Equity is Everyone’s Responsibility

Last week we mentioned the grades and equity dashboard as a useful tool for looking at who your students are and how they are doing. It is no secret that our campus continues to struggle to make equity a reality. We continue to make progress in fits and starts, but we do not need to wait for big initiatives or funding cycles to make change. The most critical equity work on campus starts with you in the classroom. The challenges are real, but we partnered with Undergraduate Education to create a list of changes we can implement as individuals in the classroom–often while the semester is ongoing. 

  • Rename office hours student hours. A simple change in name can make you more approachable and increase student utilization of time you have set aside for them. 
  • Show your students who you areSharing our own narratives with students makes it easier for them to approach us with questions.
  • Incorporate diverse examples into your assigned material. Students will not always see themselves in you and your experiences. They should see themselves in the material we assign
  • Incorporate an assignment where students draw on their personal experience. This signals to students you care about who they are and where they come from. 
  • Look for ways to lower course material costs. A 2020 survey reported about 65% of students have skipped buying course materials because of cost. This has a disproportionate impact on lower income students. Visit the Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$) website for more information about zero and low cost course materials.
  • Limit extra credit. Our students who are working, first-generation, and diverse are statistically less likely to do extra tasks. When we offer extra credit for additional work there is a disproportionate benefit for already advantaged students (Feldman, 2018, Grading for Equity).
  • Move away from high stakes assignments and towards more frequent, reflective, iterative work. Research shows that students are more likely to retain information when engaged in regular practice and application, and receive feedback that they can use to improve.  Here is some feedback from a faculty member who tried this technique in her classroom for a semester. 

For a deeper dive check out our existing teaching guides focused on inclusion and consider signing up for equity focused offerings in this semester’s FDEV slate.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences

Get Some Help

Being a University professor is awesome. You have specialized knowledge, education, and experience that makes you a valuable mentor and resource for students. Part of this dynamic is that we are used to being the most knowledgeable person in the room so asking for help can be tough, even humbling. I am here to tell you it is worth your time. 

A few years ago I was coordinating a large course on campus and noticed some numbers I did not like in terms of successful student completion of the course and equity gaps (if you have not already done so take a minute to click on the link above to check out your own courses). I have been teaching for a long time, but I realized I needed some help so I applied for the 2021 Faculty Learning Community about equity gaps. It was an amazing experience and I learned a ton from speakers, leaders, and from colleagues grappling with the same questions. 

On Monday we published our slate of programming along with partners from Undergraduate Education and International Education. Take a look and see if there is somewhere you could use a little extra help. Your love for learning and your discipline is probably what brought you to this point–keep it going and apply for a Fall 2023 Faculty Learning Community.

Zach Justus
Interim Director of Faculty Development
Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences

Supporting Justice-Impacted Students

Sent on behalf of Dr. Gabby Medina Falzone, as a follow-up to her workshop “Decarcerating the Classroom and Supporting Justice-Impacted Students”

Justice-impacted students, i.e. those who are incarcerated, have been incarcerated, and/or who have/had loved ones incarcerated, are often left out of equity education conversations. All across California, a loose coalition for justice-impacted students, faculty, staff, and allies are developing pathways for those who are justice-impacted to graduate from college.

If you want to learn more about the work being done to support incarcerated and formerly incarcerated college students across California, here are some resources

If you want to learn more about how you personally can support justice-impacted students here are some tips and resources:

  • Use humanizing language and avoid deficit-based or stigmatizing stereotypes. Check out the UC Berkeley Underground Scholars Language Guide and the workshop slides to learn more.
  • Share resources with justice-impacted students in your classes as well as formerly incarcerated potential Chico State students. Here are a few:
    • Root and Rebound “My Education, My Freedom” Toolkit (you can download it here)
    • The California Community Colleges Rising Scholar Network, which provides supports for justice-impacted students at the community college level. 
    • Chico State Rebound Scholars which is a new student org for and by Chico State justice Impacted students and allies. Currently we are meeting Fridays at 5:30pm in Ayres Hall (AYRS) 106. Have your students contact Dr. Gabby Medina Falzone (gfalzone@csuchico.edu) to find out when we will meet next semester.
  • Support Rebound Scholars’ first event. The organization is happy to welcome Shelley Winner, who with share about her journey from incarceration to professional employment, on April 25 at 6pm in BMU 203 (see flyer)
  • Help create a Project Rebound chapter here at Chico State. Currently 14 CSU campuses have a chapter. Chico State is not one of them. Contact Dr. Gabby Medina Falzone gfalzone@csuchico.edu if you are interested. 

Equity Minded Virtual Teaching

In a recent webinar on Equity-Minded Virtual Teaching (recording here), CSU faculty offered several pedagogical strategies for the transition to online instruction such as…

  • When possible, offer alternative assessment options and consider asking students to weigh in on how they would prefer to demonstrate their learning (write a paper, produce a video, create a PPT, take online quizzes, etc.).
  • Demonstrate an “authentic investment” in each students’ success.
  • Send positive and validating signals to students that “they belong at Chico State” and that “they can succeed.”

In this Thursday’s Virtual Faculty Learning Community (VFLC) from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m., we will spend the first 15 minutes discussing  equity and accessibility in online teaching. Jeremy Olguin (Director of the Office of Accessible Technology & Services) will join the conversation along with TLP staff. The remaining 45 minutes will be open to share ideas, ask questions, raise concerns, and connect with colleagues on any relevant topic. All faculty are welcome to join by clicking on this Zoom link at 10 a.m. on Thursday https://csuchico.zoom.us/j/5308985778 (you can also call in at 1-669-900-6833 and enter ID number 5308985778). Here is a summary of last week’s VFLC.

Additional Resources for you from TLP are on the Keep Teaching page including live webinars this week and next on leveraging tools in Blackboard, Zoom, and Proctorio.