Inspired 2022

Sent on behalf of Jodi Shepherd, Interim Dean of the Meriam Library, and the Meriam Library and CSE Inspired Team.

Tuesday Tip: Take a few minutes to recognize your research and creative activities for Inspired 2022. 

Event: April 6th 3:30-5:00

Inspired 2022 will be a virtual event hosted on Zoom from 3:30-5:00 on Wednesday, April 6th. During this event we’ll recognize Lantis awardees,  FRAS awards, Early Career Community Engagement award and  Our Civically Engaged Scholar Award, among others. While Inspired 2022 looks a little different this year, we are excited to celebrate the awardees and the work that has gone into research and creative activities in the past year. The decision to hold the event online was a result of COVID uncertainties and  4th floor upgrades

Unfortunately, we weren’t able to host Inspired 2020 and Inspired 2021 because of  COVID-19.  We will acknowledge past recipients during this year’s virtual event.  Recognition of awardees will also be on display in the library during the month of April. 

We hope you’ll join us to celebrate the awardees who are being recognized for their achievements. 

In-Person Exhibit: Library throughout April

The continued scholarship of Chico State faculty will be recognized with posters throughout the library during the month of April. With one poster dedicated to each department and each author’s citations listed with a link to their work, we welcome the Chico State community to view the research that has been accomplished during the pandemic. Our aim is to engage students who are in the library as well in displaying their faculty’s research achievements

Participate and be recognized. Please take a few minutes and submit your research or creative work completed between:

January 1st, 2021 to December 31st, 2021

January 1st, 2020 to December 31st, 2020

We are excited to celebrate with you,

Jodi Shepherd, Interim Dean of the Meriam Library

Equity, Diversity & Inclusion: Teaching Practices

Dear faculty,

Last week I was asked by Dr. Zach Justus to have a conversation with teaching assistants in Communication Studies about inclusive teaching practices and how equity and diversity can be brought into the classroom.

The request was both incredibly simple and incredibly complex!

My main concern was being able to condense information in a way that would be comprehensive and yet not overwhelming, and create a set of resources that could capture all the nuances of approaching EDI from a pedagogical perspective.

To be fully honest, I was surprised that I had not come up with such resources before. We have many tools about EDI in Faculty Development, they were just not collected in one place. So, this request was a great opportunity to explore some of our resources and organize them in a presentation that is easy to share. This is by no means an exhaustive and complete list, but I hope it is a good starting point for instructors that want to approach more inclusive practices in their courses.

You can access the slides here, and they will probably morph and grow into something bigger in the next weeks.

If you have used some of these practices, share your experience on our blog!

Chiara Ferrari, Ph.D. 

Faculty Development, Director 

Upcoming Opportunities to Help Faculty Navigate Research.

This Tuesday Tip brings to you some resources in relation to research and the opportunity to grow as both a teacher and a scholar! 

Faculty Development(opens in new window) is working on a number of resources that can help faculty navigate research at Chico State. Below you find links and information for upcoming opportunities: 

“Join us for a conversation about interdisciplinary research opportunities! We will hear from faculty who are currently collaborating across Departments and Colleges on various research projects, we will discuss examples of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and we will look at possible funding opportunities for collaborative research projects!” (The description will be added to the website soon) 

I also want to take this opportunity to share the link to the Co-Teaching & Community Engagement page(opens in new window) hosted by the Office of Civic Engagement(opens in new window). Here you find tips and ideas on how to consider possibilities for teaching and research collaborations!  

We hope that these resources and events will be an opportunity to learn more about support for research on campus and a chance to hear about innovative research projects at Chico State! 

Stay tuned! 

Chiara Ferrari, Ph.D. 

Faculty Development, Director 

why are students not reading the syllabus?

Dear faculty,

Today’s Tuesday Tip focuses on one of the thorniest issues in higher education: why are students not reading the syllabus?

The most recent development in this saga is the famous news from December 2021 (Smart, 2021) about a University of Tennessee professor who hid $50 in a locker at the beginning of the Fall semester and shared the information on how to unlock it in his syllabus. To no one’s surprise, the cash was untouched (and unclaimed) at the end of the semester.

While appreciating the good and playful intentions of the instructor, a Slate article (Weaver, 2022) questions the ultimate benefits of these stunts and explores the reason why most students just glance at the syllabus as opposed to dedicating time and attention to such an important document: “the biggest reason students skip such a crucial step is simple: Many syllabi are unreadable. They’re too long and clogged with opaque, administration-mandated fine print. Some are written with an eye toward a student challenging a grade—that is to say punitively, from a defensive crouch.” I also appreciate how the author of the article reminds how “syllabi not only set up expectations for a class, but are usually the first introduction to the professor. In other words, bad ones can create and perpetuate bad relationships.”

Recently, I have felt more and more that syllabi seem to be written as a weaver of liability for instructors as opposed to being written to provide resources for students. Of course this is a generalization, but it is important to open up the question and explore strategies that can help instructors create better syllabi and encourage students to actually read them.

FRIDAY FORUM: MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Faculty Development will offer a Friday Forum on February 25th (11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.) as a chance to discuss this complicated topic and to pause for a moment to think conceptually about what a syllabus should truly accomplish.

The forum, “So, the students aren’t reading the syllabus, ah?” is designed as a conversation where we can brainstorm ideas about what the function of a syllabus should be and what challenges students face in approaching an overwhelming syllabus. We will also explore alternative formats and ideas to creating engaging syllabi, such as infographics, course maps, and video syllabi.

And don’t forget that attending this workshop will count towards the FDEV Challenge!

Share ideas on our blog about strategies that have worked in your syllabi to engage students!

Lecturer Mentoring Program

Dear faculty,

Yesterday I announced in the FDEV Zine the selection of a new mentor, Tiffani Anderson, who will work with FDEV to support lecturers. I want to use this Tuesday Tip to share more details about this new program and to make sure you have all links and information available. First of all, I want to highlight the possibility to schedule an appointment with Tiffani to discuss matters pertaining to lecturers’ questions and support.

Faculty Development has renewed its commitment to targeting resources and support specifically to lectures, because while all lecturers are faculty, their needs, questions, and concerns might differ from those of tenured and tenure-track faculty. The Lecturer Mentoring Program was created in this spirit and I want to offer some tips on how to navigate this page.

Resources

  • On the webpage you find a useful infographic, created by Aaron Draper, that clarifies the type of support different offices can provide.
  • Below the infographic, under Lecturer Council, you find contact information and bios for the lecturer representative in each College. We encourage you to contact your lecturer representative if you have specific questions that pertain to your discipline or Department/College.
  • Orientation offers links to the video recordings and all slides that were shared during the lecturer orientation. These links allow you to re-watch those presentations  and explore the information or access them for the first time if you could not attend the orientation. These are good links for lectures that might not be new but still need to access this information.
  • Resources offers additional links to information that you will need as you join the Chico State faculty community, including accessing the system, important deadlines, etc.

Lecturer Academy

Faculty Development is working with Tiffani Anderson, Aaron Draper, and Erin Horst to plan a full-day lecturer academy on Friday April 29th. The academy will include a series of informational and interactive sessions followed by a reception in the evening. SAVE THE DATE for this important event and we will send more details as we have them available.

We hope that lecturers will take this opportunity to explore the website and to reach out to both Faculty Development and Tiffani Anderson to share your questions!

Showcase evidence of teaching excellence

Dear faculty,

As we get closer to the due date for turning in your dossier (February 18th), I want to take a moment to re-share some resources available in FDEV for retention, tenure, and promotion (RTP), and more general resources that can help with your dossiers (whether you are a T/TT faculty or a lecturer). Earlier this year and last year we offered a number of Friday Forums that provided insights into a variety of topics pertaining to RTP, how to write your dossier, and how to showcase evidence of your work.

I want to share the recordings from those forums, and I hope that you can find valuable information:

  1. How to Showcase Evidence of Teaching Excellence (Class Evaluations) – additional material available here
  2. How to Showcase Evidence of Teaching Excellence (in the RTP Dossier) – additional material available here
  3. How to Prepare for a Class Peer Evaluation – slides available here
  4. How to Approach Service Strategically (and write about it in your dossier)- slides and additional material available here
  5. Resources on RTP

I hope these resources will be useful and I want to encourage all faculty to reach out to Faculty Development for questions about RTP, dossier writing, class evaluations, etc. We might not have all the answers, but we should be able to point you in the right direction. I am also happy to share my dossier with anybody who would like to see an example, just reach out to me!

Comment on our blog if you want to share different ideas on how to showcase evidence of teaching excellence in your dossier.

Using Videos in the Classroom

Dear faculty,

As a media studies scholar, I know the benefits of utilizing videos in the classroom, teaching about the meaning that can be found in media texts, and designing video assignments to allow for different forms of expression.

Many of us have also learned (perhaps the hard way) how difficult it is, sometimes, to create engaging video lectures that go beyond simply recording our voice and showing a set of PPT slides on the screen.

The Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University has created a fairly extensive teaching guide on creating effective educational videos and I encourage you to explore this resource.

Faculty Development and the Technology and Learning Program are partnering in Spring 2022 to offer a series of four workshops focusing on Using Videos in the Classroom. The workshops will be offered via Zoom and will cover different aspects of educational videos:

Explore the Use of Videos in the Classroom (February 23rd, 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.)
Creating Videos for Your Curriculum (March 30th, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.)
Manage your Kaltura Videos (April 13th, 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.)
Create Student Video Assignments (April 27th, 3:00-5:00 p.m.)

The workshops are open to everyone, but we ask that you register here for the ones you wish to attend, so we can better plan each workshop based on attendance.

For any questions, please reach out to me (cfferrari@csuchico.edu) or fdev@csuchico.edu , and we look forward to working together towards creating engaging videos and engaging student assignments!

Take a Break (seriously)

Dear faculty, 

For this week’s Tuesday Tip I could not help sharing this meme. You’ve done it, it is week 16 and everyone is busy with wrapping up the semester, finishing finals, and well…. grading! 

For many of you this was the first semester back on campus after the pandemic. Others spent the semester getting used to the ChicoFlex mode of instruction, exploring the benefits of added flexibility for students. Others continued teaching online, revising your courses to better serve students in the virtual environment. Independently of HOW you have been teaching this semester, I know all faculty have shared challenges in relation to engaging students and offering a renewed sense of community. 

I want to take a moment to reiterate how Faculty Development is here to help you navigate these challenges, and we look forward to continually providing support in the semesters to come. 

Please continue sharing your needs so we can best respond to them, and make sure to find ways to relax during the next few weeks. 

The Office of Faculty development wishes you a wonderful time during the break! 

The BCCER Beckons

This Tuesday Tip is brought to you by Gary Day and Eli Goodsell

As you prepare for the upcoming spring semester, don’t forget that the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER) is here for you! Now the largest ecological reserve in the CSU system, and second overall amongst all California universities, the BCCER can be your destination for all field trips, research activities, case studies, and more!

The BCCER serves as a learning laboratory for every college on campus, providing space, resources, and knowledgeable staff for all excursions. Whether it be scientific research, experiential learning, creative inspiration, retreats, or recreation, the BCCER is campus’ backyard!

What the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve can provide for you:

  • Year-round access
  • 14 miles from campus
  • 7,835 acres of diverse habitat
  • 4.5 miles of Big Chico Creek
  • Campus’ high-speed internet (Eduroam) on site
  • Parking to accommodate any size class/event
  • Transportation on grounds provided
  • Meeting space
  • Knowledgeable staff

Reach out to the BCCER staff to find out how the BCCER can best serve you!
(530) 342-1371
bccer@csuchico.edu

Learn more about the BCCER at www.csuchico.edu/bccer. Be sure to follow us on social media to stay up to date on all the things we’re up to:
Facebook – @bigchicocreekecologicalreserve
Instagram – @csuc_reserves

Share your experience in a comment if you have visited the BCCER with your students!    

Student-Faculty Research Collaborative

This week’s tip is brought to you on behalf of the Student-Faculty Research Collaborative Team.

Participating in student-faculty research experiences at Chico State fosters student interests, expands their academic and professional skills, and provides them with authentic learning experiences in and outside the classroom. The Student-Faculty Research Collaborative encourages you to explore, discover, and be inspired through research and creative activities. Through this collaborative, Chico State students participate in research or independent creative projects with the support and mentorship of Chico State faculty members.

Key to promoting disciplinary socialization, undergraduate research experience (URE) has long been identified as a High-Impact Practice (HIP).14, 15 Well-structured URE programs are associated with increased retention, stronger STEM identity, and increased likelihood that students will pursue graduate degrees. in a study of multiple factors impacting STEM retention, determine that “faculty mentoring on its own is not necessarily associated with STEM persistence, but rather that its relationship with persistence is contingent on whether or not the student participated in research.” (Chang, M.J., Sharkness, J., Hurtado, S. and Newman, C.B. (2014). What Matters in College for Retaining Aspiring Scientists and Engineers from Underrepresented Racial Groups. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 51(5): 555–580.). Opportunity to engage in Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CUREs) may be especially important for URMs, low-income, and/or first generation students who are less likely to seek traditional UREs.

Interested in engaging in topics about authentic research?
Join the Student-Faculty Research Collaborative for the First Annual Fall Research Week
Tuesday, November 30th, to Friday, December 3rd, 2021
All Workshops will be held over Zoom.
Workshop Schedule:  Fall Research Week

Share your experience supporting student research by adding a comment.