Wildcats VOTE!

Sent on behalf of Dr. Amy Magnus, Civic Engagement Faculty Fellow and Rural Partnerships Liaison, and the Office of Civic Engagement.

The upcoming election on November 8 is right around the corner! Now is an important time for our campus community to consider how to bring civic engagement into our classes. Below are several ideas for discussing the importance of registering and turning out to vote, for those eligible, in the upcoming election: 

Connect Civic Engagement to Your Own Disciplines and Classes

Voting and other forms of civic engagement are cross-disciplinary! All of us are impacted by our elected leaders and issues on the ballot. While we may think of certain majors as being “more political” than others, all disciplines can connect civic engagement to their classes. For example, we can help students understand the impact of the election on the industries and careers they want to pursue. We can help them better understand how particular issues connect to what they are studying in class. In this way, specific examples can help students feel connected to the election (and civic engagement, more generally). It can help them understand the local and personal impacts that civic engagement can have, and it can also help them recognize their own responsibility in participating in voting. It is critical that we, as faculty, help our students recognize their connections to the politics of our time. 

Use Multiple Modalities – and Multiple Times! – to Share Information about the Election

Students do well when provided information in different formats and modalities. Sharing information about the upcoming election, voter registration, etc. verbally during class and via email announcements, for example, can help solidify their role in the upcoming election and what they need to do to participate. It may also be helpful to break down this information in relevant chunks at opportune times (rather than providing all information at once that they will need to track over time). Please see below for information you can share with students as the election approaches.

Refer Students to the Office of Civic Engagement!

Importantly, we know you have a lot to manage as faculty. We do not expect you to be experts in all-things civic engagement, in addition to your other responsibilities. The Office of Civic Engagement (OCE) is happy to help anyone in our community better understand how and why they should register to vote if eligible, how to ensure their vote counts, ways to create a voting plan, and how to find additional information about voting. There are also several upcoming events happening to help get students excited about voting (see below)! Please promote these events to your students and always feel free to refer students to OCE if they need additional support!

Please see below for relevant election-related information that you are encouraged to circulate to your students and learning communities throughout the next several weeks:

Election Day is November 8! 

The Office of Civic Engagement (OCE) website has important information and dates listed to make participating in the upcoming election as easy as possible. We are defending our championship title in the CA Ballot Bowl, a competition to register the most voters! Click here for the voter registration link.

Monday, October 24 is the last day to register online to vote in California.  

All California registered voters will receive a vote-by-mail ballot about 29 days before the election. Everyone can track their ballot at ballottrax. If your vote-by-mail ballot is lost or destroyed, check with your county for a replacement ballot or go to a Voter Assistance Center in BMU 203 November 5-8.  

Find detailed information about what’s on the November ballot at Easy Voter Guide and the Butte County Voter Information Guide.  

Key Dates 

  • Monday, October 24: Last day to register online to vote  
  • Monday, October 10 – Monday, November 7: Deliver ballots to the secure Ballot Box on the streetside of the BMU (or place in the US Mail) 
  • Saturday, November 5 – Tuesday, November 8: In person voter registration for a conditional ballot or other voter assistance is available in BMU 203 

Upcoming Civic Engagement Events 

Campus Voter Film Series 

  • Wednesday, October 12: Local Voices: Your Vote Matters! video reveal, 5-6pm, Colusa 100A, Snacks will be provided! 
  • Thursday, October 20: Documentary Screening: “Willie Velasquez: Your Vote is Your Voice” screening 5-6:30pm, SSC 150, Snacks will be provided! 

Goater Registration: Join CAVE on Tuesday, October 18 between 11- 1pm in Trinity Commons to pet a goat while you register to vote! 

Resources and Support for Neurodiversity

Sent on behalf of Dr. A. Josephine Blagrave, Associate Professor of Kinesiology and READI Equity Fellow

As we continue to improve access, equity and a sense of belonging for our students, and work to improve student retention, it is important to include our students with disabilities. Previous resources from FDEV include a teaching guide and a podcast on neurodiversity in higher education and the work Jaime Gunderson is engaging in with Universal Design for Learning. Helping our disabled and neurodivergent students, faculty and staff connect and engage with each other in shared community is important. Here are some new resources that are currently available or coming soon to improve connections and support.

Neurodiversity and Disability Symposium (September 23, 2022): Formerly the Northern California Autism Symposium, this year’s keynotes include Steve Silberman and Alycia Anderson.  

Neurodiversity Student Club  

Chico State Neurodiverse club is established to support students who identify as neurodivergent and their allies, through networking, educational activities, and events. This student group will work with the Chico State Neurodiverse Task Force, to help improve student success and support for neurodivergent students at California State University, Chico. The purpose of this club is to allow all neurodiverse students and allies to engage in social activities that help build a sense of belonging and community. Additionally, this club will host group discussions on several topics within their college career and adult life. Outside the school, the club will engage in helping neurodiverse campus and community members by participating in several events throughout the year.  

Chico Autism Spectrum Empowerment (CASE): open to all CSUC students who identify as being on the autism spectrum.  “Let’s Talk About…” sessions are held the second and fourth Mondays of each month starting at 4:00pm.  This semester’s topics include Career Preparation, Communicating with Faculty, Choosing a Major/Courses, ASD and Accommodations, etc.  Additionally, each session will provide time for open discussion regarding topics of interest related to being on the autism spectrum.  Students that are interested in getting more information can contact Terry Quinto at Accessibility Resource Center (ARC) 530 898-5959. 

Wellcat Counseling Center, ADHD Support Group: Going through college with ADHD can be challenging at best! Learn how to work with your brain’s natural strengths and get support around its obstacles. This group is designed to be a comfortable space to unmask, share some skills, gain psychoeducation about ADHD, and have some comfort in a chaotic world. Feel free to bring lunch, fidgets, drinks, and wear comfortable clothing for floor sitting if you choose! Clients do not need a formal diagnosis to be eligible to participate in the support group. All genders and types of students are welcome. 

Neurodiversity Task Force (Faculty & Staff): in Fall 2021, President Hutchinson established a Neurodiversity Taskforce to explore ways to raise awareness and acceptance and to better serve neurodivergent members of the campus community. This group continues to meet and partner with other programs on campus to improve supports, services and community for our neurodivergent students.  

Neurodiversity and Disability Affinity Group (coming soon!) 

Teaching Climate Change & Sustainability

Dear faculty, 

In an attempt to continue supporting efforts towards climate change and resilience, we are partnering this year with Jennifer Rotnem, Director of Energy & Sustainability, to approach these conversations from different and more diverse perspectives. Leading these efforts and conversations is once again Dr. Mark Stemen, who has been a tireless champion in advancing timely and challenging discussions about climate change and environmental justice. Mark is serving as Sustainability and Climate Change Faculty Fellow, collaborating with both our units. 

On behalf of this team, I want to share three main updates: 

  1. A number of resources are available to you on the Teaching Climate Change & Resilience Page. Here you can access books, resources on curriculum design and instruction, and be informed about upcoming events. 
  2. Speaking of events! Mark your calendars for Dr. Britt Wray’s visit on October 13th, 6:00 p.m at ARTS Recital Hall. Dr. Britt Wray is a Human and Planetary Health Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health, and her expertise includes studying the impact of climate change on mental health, especially on the younger generations. She is the author of Generation Dread: Finding Purpose in an Age of Climate Crisis. She has recorded a video for us that is available on the page linked above. 
  3. Lastly, be on the lookout for announcements and communication about opportunities to come together to discuss sustainability and climate change. We look forward to having a dynamic group of faculty join us! If you are interested in participating in these conversations, please let us know! 

We look forward to expanding awareness about sustainability across the campus! 

RTP Forum Resources

Dear faculty,

ah, what a day yesterday was! Between the excitement of the RTP discussions and Labor Day, my week got all confused, so here you are getting a Tuesday Tip on a Wednesday! Way to spice up FDEV!

I am happy to share resources from yesterday’s RTP forum, so if you missed it, you can access all information asynchronously.

RTP Forum video recording
RTP Forum slides (the last two slides offer resources and dossier samples you can access and explore)
(both resources are posted in the Friday Forum page)

I also want to take this opportunity to share a great video (Passcode: 2M1!kV5k) that Director of Civic Engagement Dr. Ann Schulte put together to show how the Collaboratory: Community Engagement Database can be used to enhance your dossier.

We will be offering a Friday Forum in the near future about all the possibilities Collaboratory offers, so stay tuned for that announcement!

I truly hope the forum was useful, and please remember that the Office of Faculty Development is always open to help you in the tenure, retention, and promotion journey!

Universal Design for Learning FLC

Dear faculty,

I am excited to promote a new faculty learning community (FLC) focusing on Universal Design for Learning (UDL), which will be offered during the 2022-2023 academic year! Dr. Jamie Linn Gunderson and Dr. Kathryn Mercurio will co-lead this FLC. 

 In this FLC, participants are invited to think about UDL in the design of their assignments, assessments, and activities to promote inclusion, accessibility, and student success. During the FLC, participants will be guided through the creation of interactive lessons, activities, and assessments that align with the principles, guidelines, and checkpoints of UDL. This is the first FLC offered under the auspices of READI, the new hub for Research in Equity, Antiracism, Diversity and Inclusion, housed in Faculty Development. We will use this FLC to pilot an assessment model of FDEV programs as they impact student success, to fully understand how faculty’s professional development can improve equitable student learning.

 Please review the full call for applications (Google Doc), and read more about the UDL guidelines(opens in new window). I also want to share an episode(opens in new window) of Rise, Teach, Learn (the FDEV podcast) that focuses on UDL. In our next podcast episode(opens in new window) (to be released on September 8th) Jamie, Katie, and I will sit down to discuss some aspects of the FLC in more detail, so stay tuned if you want to learn more!

 Applications to the FLC will close on Monday September 12th, at 5:00 pm. Please fill out this google form(opens in new window), if you plan to apply.

 FLC meetings times

The FLC will meet monthly on Thursdays from 12:30 -2:00 PM. The meetings will occur in person and/or via Zoom using Chicoflex technology.9/29/22 Introduction and Exploration of UDL

10/27/22 Culturally Responsive Learning Environments & Inclusive Syllabi
11/17/22 UDL: Designing Relevant and Rigorous Assignments & Assessments
12/15/22 Inclusive & Accessible Syllabi Showcase
2/16/23 UDL: Designing Engaging Lessons and Activities
3/23/23 UDL: Accessible Learning Materials and Resources
4/13/23 Collaborative Work Session – Model Course Design Portfolio
5/11/23 Course Design/Redesign Symposium

Please contact Jamie Linn Gunderson (jlgunderson@csuchico.edu(opens in new window)) for questions related to this FLC or Chiara Ferrari cfferrari@csuchico.edu(opens in new window), Director of Faculty Development, for broader questions related to FDEV. 

Welcome Back Faculty!

Dear faculty, 

I have greatly missed the energy and conversations that all of you bring to Faculty Development and I cannot wait to start offering programs that facilitate meaningful discussions about teaching & learning, research, and other faculty needs. 

As I welcome you back to campus, I want to share some news about this year, so you can begin reaching out to Faculty Development and participating in our initiatives. 

First, I hope you will start taking advantage of the Rose Garden Room, now that the 4th floor of the library is open again! The Rose Garden Room is located in MLIB 459 and it is open to faculty Monday to Friday, from 8am to 5pm. It is a wonderful space to read, grade, write, and meet wonderful colleagues.  

I also want to share that this semester we will launch a new FDEV Challenge, starting Wednesday September 7th, so check your email for a chance to receive a $50 gift certificate at the end of the semester! 

Lastly, I want to announce a new faculty learning community that we will offer this year, focusing on Universal Design for Learning. We are finalizing the call, and we will send it out in early September. We hope that you will consider applying, so stay tuned for more information! 

Welcome back, dear faculty, I cannot wait to see all of you around campus! 

Faculty Mentorship-Partnership

Dear faculty,

During this semester Faculty Development embarked on important conversations about what faculty mentorship can look like at its best.

I am proud that Faculty Development offers mentorship programs for both tenure track and lecturer faculty, and we look forward to continue expanding the resources we provide.

Mentorship of course can happen in different forms, more or less officially, but at the core of mentorship should always be some form of trust and the feeling that the learning experience is mutual, and not one directional. Tomorrow, the equity fellows and I will discuss an article by Rachel Endo, “Retaining and Supporting Faculty Who Are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color: The Promise of a Multi-Leveled Mentoring-Partnership Model” (2020).

Endo proposes a “mentoring-partnership” model that promotes “alternative paradigms for conceptualizing mentoring as dynamic partnerships with differentiated, equity-focused, and multi-leveled systems of support that explicitly center anti-racist and anti-deficit frameworks as core values” (170). I hope that all faculty will join us in exploring these concepts, whether you identify as a mentor or a mentee, and that as a university we will spend some time considering what mentorship-partnership models at Chico State can look like.

Following Endo’s model and as we prepare to launch the READI hub in the Fall, I look forward to exploring ways in which Faculty Development can embrace non-dominant mentorship frameworks, in order to be able to support and retain all our faculty.

Share your impression about the article in a comment below!

The Rigor Dilemma

Dear faculty,

I attend monthly meetings with all the faculty development directors in the CSU, and during our last meeting one of them shared a newsletter from the Chronicle of Higher Education, titled “Teaching: A Different Way of Thinking About Rigor” (Supiano, 2021).

The author mentions the rigor wars that have originated among faculty as a consequence of the pandemic and how different camps seem to have reached irreconcilable differences in this debate: should we still thrive for rigor or should we abandon it completely?

In her attempt to reframe the debate in a more nuanced fashion, Supiano shares three important principles discussed by Jamiella Brooks (associate director at the Center for Teaching and Learning at the University of Pennsylvania) and Julie McGurk, (director of faculty teaching initiatives at Yale University’s Poorvu Center for Teaching and Learning):

  • “Rigor, when defined apart from a deficit ideology, is necessary to teach more inclusively.
  • Inadequate definitions of rigor produce poorer learning outcomes, particularly for underrepresented and/or underserved students.
  • Rigor is not hard for the sake of being hard; it is purposeful and transparent.” (Supiano, 2021)

The principle that mostly resonated with me is the last one: rigor for the sake of rigor – harshness for the sake of harshness – is meaningless. I was educated in a similar environment, in European high schools and Colleges where old male professors lectured for hours. I confess: that approach worked well for me. I always loved learning and reading, and I loved the academic and intellectual conversations.

But the question is: should we really measure what successful and equitable learning is based on what worked for us – a bunch of scholars who love spending time reading and doing research and never or rarely struggled in class? If we are designing our courses based on what worked for us, we are probably missing the mark, and by a long shot, I must say.

So, I hope this Tuesday Tip invites us all to reconsider what purposeful rigor can look like and how we can create high expectations for our students without alienating them.

Comment on our blog and share your experience in creating high expectations for students that still promote an inclusive learning environment!

Information Literacy

Dear faculty, 

We had the pleasure to offer a Friday Forum last week on information literacy, particularly on the way the Framework for Information Literacy can be applied to our curriculum. 

If you missed the workshop led by Irene Korber and William Cuthbertson, I encourage you to explore these resources: 

Video Recording of the workshop 
Google Slides presentation
Handout from the Association of College and Research Libraries

Starting in Fall 2022, information literacy will be included as one of the 5 outcomes in the GE Program at Chico State, allowing students to: “Demonstrate[s] the abilities to recognize when there is a need for information; to identify, locate, and evaluate information; and to effectively, responsibly, and ethically use and share information for the question at hand.” If you are teaching a course that will incorporate information literacy as a student learning outcome, these resources are truly invaluable! 

I also want to encourage you to reach out to our librarians for the following resources: 

  • One-shot information literacy session 
  • Information literacy workshop series 
  • Integrating information literacy into your assignments 
  • Assigned research appointments 

We hope you will find these tools helpful! 

Supporting Justice-Impacted Students

Sent on behalf of Dr. Gabby Medina Falzone, as a follow-up to her workshop “Decarcerating the Classroom and Supporting Justice-Impacted Students”

Justice-impacted students, i.e. those who are incarcerated, have been incarcerated, and/or who have/had loved ones incarcerated, are often left out of equity education conversations. All across California, a loose coalition for justice-impacted students, faculty, staff, and allies are developing pathways for those who are justice-impacted to graduate from college.

If you want to learn more about the work being done to support incarcerated and formerly incarcerated college students across California, here are some resources

If you want to learn more about how you personally can support justice-impacted students here are some tips and resources:

  • Use humanizing language and avoid deficit-based or stigmatizing stereotypes. Check out the UC Berkeley Underground Scholars Language Guide and the workshop slides to learn more.
  • Share resources with justice-impacted students in your classes as well as formerly incarcerated potential Chico State students. Here are a few:
    • Root and Rebound “My Education, My Freedom” Toolkit (you can download it here)
    • The California Community Colleges Rising Scholar Network, which provides supports for justice-impacted students at the community college level. 
    • Chico State Rebound Scholars which is a new student org for and by Chico State justice Impacted students and allies. Currently we are meeting Fridays at 5:30pm in Ayres Hall (AYRS) 106. Have your students contact Dr. Gabby Medina Falzone (gfalzone@csuchico.edu) to find out when we will meet next semester.
  • Support Rebound Scholars’ first event. The organization is happy to welcome Shelley Winner, who with share about her journey from incarceration to professional employment, on April 25 at 6pm in BMU 203 (see flyer)
  • Help create a Project Rebound chapter here at Chico State. Currently 14 CSU campuses have a chapter. Chico State is not one of them. Contact Dr. Gabby Medina Falzone gfalzone@csuchico.edu if you are interested.