What the career center can do for you!

This week’s Tuesday Tip is brought to you by Betina Wildhaber, Career Advisor in the Career Center.

Dear faculty,

Consider inviting the Career Center to your classes, especially if you have a conference presentation and you are looking for a way to cover your course! We know things may come up during the semester. If you find yourself in a pinch, or would just like to ensure that your students know about the Career Center, please consider having your Career Advisor come to talk about any of the following topics: What the Career Center can do for you, Creating an effective resume and/or cover letter, Successful interviewing techniques, Professional etiquette and behavior in the workplace, Making the most of the Career Fair, Internships 101, Focus2 – Career & Major Exploration platform, or a Custom Presentation Topic. You can request a presentation or simply identify your Career Advisor liaison and reach out to them directly.

What can we do for your students? Well, a little bit of everything from exploring major to career, reviewing resumes and cover letters, practice interviewing, networking through LinkedIn, graduate school search and application support, and so much more. Encourage your students to attend the multiple Career Fairs where each attract 100+ employers with career and internship positions. Do you know an alumnus needing career support? We offer our career services for FREE for LIFE! Furthermore we provide various career resources such as our Career Planning Handbook, Focus2, Handshake (50,000+ jobs were posted on Handshake in the 2019-2020 academic year), and Diversity Career Resources, just to name a few.

Betina D. Wildhaber, M.A. 
Career Advisor (Connect with me on LinkedIn)
California State University, Chico
College of Humanities & Fine Arts College of Natural Science
Website  |  Instagram  |  LinkedIn

Share your best career advice as a comment.

Global Engagement Opportunities for Faculty & Students

This week’s Tuesday Tip is brought to you by International Education and Global Engagement (IEGE).

As study abroad opens up the world for students, teaching and conducting research abroad can be a life-changing experience for faculty, tapping into resources and developing pedagogy that incorporates global learning and engagement, a strategic priority of the University.

Chico State joins higher education institutions around the world in honoring and celebrating International Education Week from November 15-19, 2021. IEGE is hosting a series of activities next week for faculty, staff, and students to engage in global learning and cultural events, we ask that you encourage your students to attend, and explore international research and teaching opportunities for yourself.

Research and teaching with global partners, physically or virtually, provides space for faculty to develop intercultural competency and inclusive communication that enrich the CSU, Chico experience. Through these opportunities, faculty can also empathize with the experience of international students, staff and faculty at Chico State, as the instructor is immersed in different languages and cultures and learns to navigate a new educational system and environment. IEGE can help support faculty to internationalize their courses by adding a cultural and academic exchange experience within a class through Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL).

Additional learning opportunities for global engagement and resources available to Chico State faculty include,  

  1. Upcoming Fulbright Scholar Program Q&A – learn more about this grant and how to put together a successful Fulbright program application for 2023-2024.  Fulbright program staff will discuss award opportunities, the application & selection process, and answer all questions.
  2. Apply to become a Resident Director on a CSU International Program in France, Italy or Spain for a year, deadline to apply is December 31, 2021. Contact Chico State ACIP Rep, Dr. Fay Mitchell-Brown, with questions: fmitchellbrown@csuchico.edu.
  3. Learn more about the COIL experiences of faculty, students and teaching partners through this panel presentation. For more information on COIL Faculty Learning Community, please contact COIL Co-coordinator, Dr. Sara Trechter, strechter@csuchico.edu.
  4. Invite a Study Abroad and Exchange advisor in your class(es) to present on program options, specifically tailored to your department or student interests, by completing this classroom presentation request form.
  5. Join the International Faculty and Staff Association.
  6. Encourage your students to visit the campus English as a Second Language (ESL) Support Services, which offers free online tutoring services for non-native speakers of English who want to improve their English proficiency. 
  7. Consider hosting a visiting international scholar in your academic department.
  8. Take students abroad through Faculty-Led Study Abroad. Deadlines vary by term.

Need more information than above?

Contact Dr. Jennifer Gruber, jlgruber@csuchico.edu, Interim AVP for International Education and Global Engagement.

Share your experience about studying and/or teaching abroad by adding a comment.

ChicoFlex Updates and Training Opportunities

Dear faculty,

I want to take the opportunity of this Tuesday tip to remind you of a number of resources related to ChicoFlex technology and pedagogy. First of all, I want to point you to this website, which clarifies some general questions about this mode of instruction and provides updates on the technology and the trainings available.

Winter 2022 GoFlex training
Kathy Fernandes and I, together with the Technology & Learning Program (TLP), have been hard at work to plan additional training for faculty interested in teaching ChicoFlex courses and, more broadly, in hybrid pedagogy. There is currently an open call for faculty interested in participating or mentoring in our Winter 2022 GoFlex session. This 5-day session is designed to prepare faculty who have not attended GoFlex in Summer 2021.This Winter session will also have a STEM track focusing on implementing ChicoFlex in courses offered in the Science building.

DATES: January 5, 6, 7, 11, 12 (skipping January 10th, Monday), 2022. You can read more information in the Call for Applications. Applications are due by Wednesday, November 17th.

If you want to learn more about GoFlex, you can visit this website, which includes faculty showcase videos.

ChicoFlex and Hyflex Fellows
Additional efforts in relation to ChicoFlex and hyflex pedagogy include the selection of six faculty that will work with Faculty Development and the Technology and Learning Program in Spring 2022 to develop an assessment plan for the ChicoFlex model and will start piloting a full hyflex mode of instruction. The key difference between ChicoFlex and hyflex is that ChicoFlex does not include the possibility for students to attend a course fully asynchronously, while full hyflex courses in the future will. You can read more about this distinction here.

Faculty Learning Community: Innovative Hyflex and Inclusive Pedagogy
Lastly, I want to announce a new faculty learning community that will be offered in Spring 2022. Dr. Jamie Gunderson will lead 20-25 faculty in a learning community that will focus on universal design for learning and will encourage faculty to create inclusive hybrid and virtual learning spaces. The call will come out on November 15th, together with all FDEV Spring 2022 programs, so stay tuned! Share your experience on our blog if you are teaching a ChicoFlex course this semester and/or you have completed GoFlex in the Summer!

Add a comment to share your experience if you are teaching a ChicoFlex course this semester and/or you have completed GoFlex in the Summer!

Rose Garden Room

Dear faculty,

Do you know that faculty have a dedicated space in the Rose Garden Room (MLIB 459)?

As many of you have transitioned to in person classes, I want to make sure that you are aware of this wonderful space (with an amazing view of campus).

Faculty are welcome to use the Rose Garden Room Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for writing, reading, grading, or just to take a break.

Per Meriam Library policy, food is currently not allowed and masked are required.

It is not a coincidence that the photos featured on the Faculty Development website include me: I have always found the Rose Garden Room an incredibly refreshing space to be productive while meeting new colleagues, and I hope that you will come enjoy this space (and “say hi” to us next door)!

Let us know how you like to use the Rose Garden Room by adding a comment below!

Lecturers, You Belong Here!

Dear faculty, 

It is not uncommon in Faculty Development to receive emails from lecturers asking for clarification about whether the programs and events that FDEV offers are open to lecturers or not. 

I always found those emails and questions incredibly strange: “why wouldn’t they be open to lecturers, I wonder, since lecturers are faculty?” 

Talking to colleagues who are lecturers and asking for clarification, however, I came to realize that this question really hides a more nuanced and problematic concern. What lecturers are really asking me is: am I welcome to these programs, as a lecturer

Frankly, this more complex reading of the question has both humbled me tremendously and broken my heart, because this concern ultimately sheds light on the fact that several lecturers do not feel like they belong at our institution. And this is the part that is particularly hard to digest as faculty development director. There is a quote in this article (“Striking a Major Blow to Adjunctification”) that matches this sentiment: “After moving to the city’s Eastside, I worked as an adjunct for three years. I commuted an hour north to a beautiful, prosperous, hypermodern campus, where I squatted in a borrowed office to eat my lunch, make my lesson plans and meet my students, as is common for contingent faculty. (One semester, a kind administrator advised me to squat in the conference room instead, though I had to hide my belongings in the filing cabinet when real faculty needed the space).” (Wyman, 2021). 

I want to assure you that in Faculty Development we consider all faculty as “real faculty,” and while lecturers certainly face different experiences depending on Departments, Colleges, disciplines, etc., Faculty Development offers a space where every faculty belongs, independently of rank or other factors. For this reason, I am excited to announce a number of FDEV resources and initiatives to support lecturers: 

  1. Faculty Development will be offering a Friday Forum on lecturer resources and support on Friday, October 29th, from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. This is a chance to hear about resources on campus available from different units and offices. 
  2. The November issue of the FDEV Zine will entirely be dedicated to lecturers’ information, conversations, and sense of belonging. The Zine will be released on Monday, November 1st. 
  3. Faculty Development has committed funding to create a lecturer mentor position for spring 2022. A call for applications will come out in the next week or so. 
  4. Faculty Development has also committed to planning a full-day lecturer academy event in spring 2022, in collaboration with the lecturers council. We will send more information in early spring. 

I want to take this opportunity to thank all the lecturers that have educated me about their experience, that have opened my mind about how different a lecturer’s experience can be when compared to that of a tenure-track or tenured professor, and ultimately have given true meaning to the question “are FDEV programs open to lecturers?” 

Add a comment below to share ways FDEV can support you as a lecturer.

Learning Agreements

This Tuesday Tip is sent on behalf of joshuah whittinghill, Information Technology Consultant in the Technology & Learning Program 

Hello faculty,

Whether we plan it or not, building community is part of what we do as faculty. Not only is community being built, but it is crucial to students, as they find successes through connections they make with their peers as well as with us. 

As education evolves, so do our experiences, abilities, and resources. This week’s Tuesday Tip is another opportunity to highlight engagement. One way to increase engagement for students, as well as ourselves, is to examine accountability. Have you ever asked yourself, “How do I hold myself accountable? How do I ensure students are holding themselves accountable?”   

How do you create individual and collective accountability in your courses? According to accountability theory, it is common for members of a group (i.e. college classes) to develop a need to justify one’s behaviors to others, which causes one to consider and feel accountable for the process by which decisions and judgments have been reached. One way to cultivate accountability is by using learning agreements in your courses.  

Learning agreements enhance students’ education by helping them understand the importance of adhering to their own best practices and goals.

Learning agreements have also shown to:

  • Create individual and group accountability
  • Enhance students’ investment in their education
  • Develop personal and community connections to collective successes
  • Develop a guide for student to content engagement 
  • Build community

As the instructor, you can share two agreements you feel would be useful for the course, then ask students to add their agreements. Often creating course agreements is often useful to do the first week of the term, followed up during the second week with time for everyone to review and agree on agreements to that time.

In order to maximize course learning agreements, it is important that everyone has access to them, that the document can be amended during the semester. As the instructor, it is important to revisit them weekly during a class meeting, announcement, email, or text. Revisiting them can be resharing the link to your course learning agreement document, highlighting one or two agreements each week in a message or during class time.

Here is a Google doc with instructions to create a shared and editable document so all members of the course have access and can contribute.

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

Dear faculty,

Last year, the Office of Faculty Development committed to sponsoring and promoting programs and events that would support the implementation of equity, diversity, and inclusion in the classroom. This commitment was in line with the University’s strategic priorities and was supported by GI2025 student success funding that we were able to roll over from 2019-2020. Some of the best aspects of these efforts included the ability to create collaborations across divisions, the opportunity to challenge ourselves and our pedagogical practices, the possibility to extend these conversations across most disciplines and Colleges, and the chance to give voice to a number of faculty that truly are advocates and activists for the implementation of equity on campus.

Rebecca Nelson and I also participated in the third Middle Leadership Academy cohort last year, and I think I speak for both of us when I say that we learned a great deal of information and practices that we are committed to bringing to faculty development, including a number of resources about faculty’s role in this work.

This year we are excited to sponsor a second Teaching Racial & Social Justice (TRSJ) Series and I want to take this opportunity to invite you to our first workshop, Confronting the Traditional Learning Space: Anchoring Your course in an Antiracist, Inclusive, and Culturally Sustaining Framework, which will be held on Wednesday, October 13th from 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. in Zoom. This workshop will explore and unpack an evaluation tool that is grounded in the Anti-Racist Quality Learning and Teaching (AR-QLT) framework, developed by Dr. Daniel Soodjinda and used as a guide by a faculty learning community at CSU Stanislaus.  The AR-QLT framework contains a set of 11 Antiracist, Inclusive, and Culturally Sustaining objectives, and faculty can use the AR-QLT instrument to assess their courses, learn where there are equity gaps, and take the steps necessary to meaningfully support their diverse classrooms.

Our next workshop, Throwing Out the Syllabus: Responding to Crisis in Real Time will be offered on October 27th from 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. in Zoom and will be led by Dr. Claudia Sofía Garriga-López.

We hope that you will join us for these important conversations.

An Exploration of Podcasting in Higher Education

Dear faculty,

This Tuesday Tip is written to encourage you to attend our new series on Podcasting for Teaching and Learning, which will start next week. Faculty Development is organizing the series in collaboration with the Technology and Learning Program, and we hope that you are excited to learn more about how podcasting can be used in your classes. As you can see in the webpage, the meetings will be held in Glenn 302 (a hyflex room, yay!) and also via Zoom, so feel free to attend in your preferred fashion, but we do ask that you register here so we can plan according to the expected audience.

In tandem with this series, I want to make sure that you are aware of a number of resources available on our website:

In particular, I want to point out this article, “Can creative podcasting promote deep learning? The use of podcasting for learning content in an undergraduate science unit” (Pegrum, Bartle & Longnecker, 2014), which examines the use of podcasts in an undergraduate chemistry course, specifically in relation to deep learning. I want to encourage all faculty to think of ways in which podcasting could be useful and beneficial in your classes, across Colleges, disciplines, and formats.

The first workshop will be held next Wednesday, September 29th, 3:00-4:30 pm, and we hope to see you there!

Add a comment to share ways in which you use podcasting in your class!

Chico Affordable Learning Solutions

Sent on behalf of Beth Shook and Edward Roualdes, CAL$ program leads

Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$) provides resources to faculty regarding affordable course materials, including how to find and adopt quality zero-cost or low-cost textbooks and other materials, or create Open Educational Resources (OERs). 

CAL$ has been on the Chico State campus since 2013, and went by the name Textbook Affordability Project (TAP) until 2018. We adopted the name Chico Affordable Learning Solutions to better align our campus effort with the Chancellor’s Office program, Affordable Learning Solutions. CAL$ has offered both summer and academic-year workshops as well as does one-on-one mentoring with faculty. Since 2014, Chico State faculty participating in CAL$ programs have helped students save over 1.2 million dollars.

About OER
Open Educational Resources (OER), for the purposes of CAL$ funded opportunities, are defined as teaching and learning materials that are in the public domain or licensed to allow anyone free and perpetual access to them. OER materials should allow others to engage in the five 5 R activities:  reuse, retain, revise, remix, and redistribute. OERs include a wide range of materials including books, case studies, reference materials, assessments, assignments, tutorials, slides, videos, and more.

Funding opportunity
Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$), for the first time since its inception, is pleased to offer course release support to faculty who want to create their own Open Educational Resources. With funding from the Chancellor’s Office program Affordable Learning Solutions, CAL$ will be able to provide course releases for three faculty members (of up to 3 AWTU per participant) in spring 2022. Applicants should follow the Call For Applications, which are due by Friday, October 1. We anticipate notifying selected applicants by Friday, October 8th.

Rekindling Faculty’s Passion

Dearest faculty,

I don’t know about you, but the first 2-3 weeks have been… weird. There, I said it. I am on campus, I enjoy the FDEV office space and team dynamic, I am energized by the colleagues I see, and yet, most of my meetings are still in Zoom, so I feel I am living in a limbo between limited in-person interactions and the ever-present virtual world. 

In doing some reading in preparation for this Tuesday Tip, I came across an article from The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Great Disillusionment (Ellis, 2021). The author presents a fairly grim look at academia, from the perspective of both faculty and staff, and she explores how, while “employees’ dedication to higher education’s mission has fueled colleges for many years […], the pandemic has caused many people to renegotiate this dynamic.” More specifically, Ellis shares how “the graciousness, the compassion, the ‘we do it for the students, we do it for the work’ — that’s gone.”

This year I would like to commit, as Faculty Development Director, to rekindle some of that graciousness, compassion, and passion and to focus on faculty’s needs more closely. Let me be clear, though: my commitment does not involve glorifying practices that justify working overtime and prioritizing work over health and wellness. I am not looking for faculty to embrace compassion at the expense of their well-being. I want to commit to rekindling faculty’s passion by offering resources, programs, and events that can help faculty thrive in all areas of their professional growth.

Last year, FDEV was inevitably very “reactive” to the pandemic, the switch to online instruction, and the need for supplemental training in digital pedagogy and academic technologies. For this, we have received very good feedback and we are grateful that our efforts could respond to and serve your needs. But looking at the low number of applications for FDEV programs in Fall 2021, I started wondering if we are truly responding to your current needs. This is certainly not a criticism towards the low number of applications we are receiving: on the contrary, I see this is a clear call for the Director of Faculty Development to stop for a minute, listen to “her” faculty, and re-think what faculty truly need to thrive. 

For this reason, we had a long and important conversation last Friday with the FDEV Advisory Board to discuss how, whether we are reacting to the pandemic, climate change, the wildfires, or social and racial injustice, the burnout is palpable, and we are now constantly in “survival mode.” 

Good job, Sherlock, you might think: did you really need an Advisory Board meeting for that??
Well, no, I did not need an Advisory Board meeting to know faculty are burned out. I needed that conversation to discuss how to better respond to and address the exhaustion I feel so present, though.

In this spirit, we have extended the deadline for the open calls of all FDEV Fall 2021 programs, and we have designed THIS SURVEY to collect feedback so that we can plan the rest of the year with your needs in mind. 

I hope that you will be willing to take a few minutes out of your day to fill out this survey, knowing that the Advisory Board and I will read your feedback carefully and we will use it to guide our efforts. 

Faculty, you are my priority, now and always, and I am here to support you in every way I can.