Podcasting for Teaching & Learning

As a film scholar in love with Orson Welles, I remember the first time I listened to the controversial 1938 War of the Worlds: I was fascinated by both the concept (a Halloween prank that turned into mass hysteria) and the content (the narrative of aliens attacking Earth). And of course, by Orson Welles’ incredible voice (seriously, just listen to it if you haven’t yet).  

Since then, radio technology has evolved significantly, and now we all have our favorite podcasts saved on our phones. But a core element has not changed: good storytelling. And I’ve always loved to think about teaching as a form of storytelling. Podcasts have been used very successfully for both teaching and learning, at various educational levels. As one podcaster reminds us, “students listen for longer than they’ll watch or read,” podcasts are easily accessible, and promote better learning for students with mental and visual disabilities. EdTech offers some recommendations about Higher Ed podcasts, this article even discusses the benefits of podcasts for faculty development, and this podcast offers great pedagogical resources for instructors.  

If you want to learn more about podcasting for teaching and learning, the Office of Faculty Development will hold a Friday Forum on December 4th via Zoom, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.  

A panel of faculty will share their experience with podcasts, discuss tips and best practices, and offer ideas on how you could use podcasts in your own classes.  

Lastly, I want to remind everyone about the call for applications for FDEV Spring 2021 programs, see below: 

Closing the Equity Gaps Faculty Learning Community 

Digital Pedagogy Faculty Learning Community 

Faculty Writing Community 

Quality Learning and Teaching Workshops 

All calls for applications will close on Monday, December 7th, at 5:00 p.m. You can also find a list of all open calls in the FDEV Programs page

We look forward to receiving your applications and being able to offer you continued support! 

FDEV Programs for Spring 2021

The Office of Faculty Development is excited to share with you the call for applications for all Spring 2021 programs. The Faculty Development Advisory Board was instrumental in helping me understand and address faculty’s needs, and we hope that these offerings will provide support for your teaching and your professional growth and achievement.

The offerings include both Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs), tied to specific meeting dates and times, and other programs designed to allow for more flexibility in participation.

Please refer to the calls for application below:

Closing the Equity Gaps Faculty Learning Community

Digital Pedagogy Faculty Learning Community

Faculty Writing Community

Quality Learning and Teaching Workshops

All calls for applications will close on Monday, December 7th, at 5:00 p.m. You can find a list of all open calls in our FDEV Programs page.

We also want to announce that the deadline for applications for the Go Virtual Intersession has been extended to December 2nd.

We encourage you to attend it, if you did not have a chance to attend the Go Virtual institute in the summer.

We look forward to receiving your applications and being able to offer you continued support!

Poll Everywhere & Student Engagement

Hello? Anyone out there? 

Wondering if anyone is behind those black screens? Looking for new ways to check-in and engage students or colleagues online?  Poll Everywhere might be able to assist you! Poll Everywhere is Chico State’s new online polling software available to all instructors, staff, and students for free. Come and learn the various engagement activities available to you and how they can easily be incorporated into your PPT presentations, Google Slides, and into Blackboard.   

Faculty, staff and students must use their Chico State campus email address with the account.  

BROWN BAG SESSION: Poll Everywhere 

WHO: Claudine Franquet, ITC in TLP 

WHEN: Friday, October 16th 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

WHERE: Zoom 

Meeting ID: 919 3973 8505 

Password: Chico 

This Tuesday Tip is brought to you by Claudine Franquet, instructional technology consultant in the Technology & Learning Program. 

Election Day

Today is a complex day, made even harder by the lack of human interaction that we are all experiencing due to Covid-19.

Ann Schulte, our director of Civic Engagement, reminds us that the presidential election is an important event, especially for those who are voting for the first time, like many of our students. Our democracy, however, depends on far more civic participation than once every four years. Being an ally and working to make a difference in our local communities happens every day. We can help our students use their voice and learn to advocate through many different avenues.

The Chronicle of Higher Education offers some advice about preparing students for the aftermath of the election in our mostly virtual world. Inside Higher Ed offers lessons from the 2016 election and reminds us that “we need a framework to engage and support our students.”

In this spirit, we want to share some available resources:

  • Sue Peterson, Chico State Debate Coach, shared her ideas about how to use Living Room Conversations in a Friday Forum
  • The WellCat Counseling Center has created a guidebook to help faculty facilitate conversations
  • The WellCat Counseling Center has also have set aside time to talk with students who are having election-related anxiety and resources to support students experiencing racial trauma

Today’s tip is really about trying to take extra care of your students and yourselves in the coming days, as we navigate a historical election.

Collecting Student Feedback

What week is this anyways? Covid-19 has brought upon all of us a strange feeling of “time dilation” that makes us lose track of how far we are in the semester. 

So, if you lost track, let me update you: this is week 10! Crazy, ah? 

Faculty have somehow adjusted to the online environment by now, and everyone is doing as best as they can possibly can to ensure that our students’ learning experience is still rich and meaningful.  

But how are our students doing in our classes? I’m not talking about grades, really, but about something more profound: what is our students’ experience? How are they approaching and owning their own learning? 

Collecting student feedback in the middle of a semester is a great way to get a sense of how students are interacting with the material, what is working for them, or what they are struggling with, and it gives faculty a chance to tweak their course “in real time,” therefore affecting the very students that share that feedback. 

I want to share some quick slides that offer resources on collecting student feedback and a google doc that includes sample surveys or assignment ideas. 

I am grateful every day for the care that faculty are putting into our students’ learning and well-being, and I hope that these resources can help us understand our students’ experience even better. 

“Living Room Conversations”

This Tuesday Tip is brought to you by Sue Peterson, Chico State Speech and Debate Coach.

The November 3rd election has created challenges for class discussion, but also opportunities to have meaningful conversations. Given the complex and controversial nature of the election and American politics, though, these conversations are not always easy to manage and moderate.

Sue will talk with faculty about how these conversations might be helpful for students before and after the November 3rd election through the Living Room Conversations model. 

Join us for a Friday Forum, this Friday, October 23rd, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., via Zoom. This session will be recorded and posted on the FDEV media channel.

Living Room Conversations is an organization that offers a simple, sociable and structured way to practice communicating across differences while building understanding and relationships. Typically, 4-6 people meet in person or by video call for 60-90 minutes to listen to and be heard by others on one of our nearly 100 topics. Rather than debating or convincing others, we take turns talking to share, learn, and be curious. The format transfers well into a small group activity in the classroom.

The organization provides for a guided conversation that is designed to foster understanding by gathering information and humanizing the issues.  Participants first agree to a set of foundational agreements used for discussing any controversial issue in a productive way.  Scripts are available on the 2020 election, race and racism, Coronavirus, environmental concerns, guns, healthcare and so much more.  These scripts offer the chance for everyone to feel safe, heard, and understood.  

Sue Peterson, has used the Living Room Conversation framework in her General Education classes and the students found them to be valuable as a way of engaging topics and issues that they are often fearful of having with others. The scripted questions and time guides help to create a space to share more easily. Students reported that they felt they could communicate “with sincere inquiry and thoughtful reflection” and that they “felt seen and heard by the members of their group.”  

For a list of other events to support election dialogue, go to Wildcats Engage.

Poll Everywhere & Student Engagement

Hello? Anyone out there? 

Wondering if anyone is behind those black screens? Looking for new ways to check-in and engage students or colleagues online?  Poll Everywhere might be able to assist you! Poll Everywhere is Chico State’s new online polling software available to all instructors, staff, and students for free. Come and learn the various engagement activities available to you and how they can easily be incorporated into your PPT presentations, Google Slides, and into Blackboard.   

Faculty, staff and students must use their Chico State campus email address with the account.  

BROWN BAG SESSION: Poll Everywhere 

WHO: Claudine Franquet, ITC in TLP 

WHEN: Friday, October 16th 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

WHERE: Zoom  

Meeting ID: 919 3973 8505 

Password: Chico 

This Tuesday Tip is brought to you by Claudine Franquet, instructional technology consultant in the Technology & Learning Program. 

Textbook Information & Adoption

The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) was signed into Law in 2008 to address important issues that include student rights, student financial aid, and transparency in tuition and fees. You can read this summary to learn about key aspects that the HEOA governs. One fundamental area of the Act refers to the requirement to provide textbook information (section 112) “to ensure that students have access to affordable course materials by decreasing costs to students and enhancing transparency and disclosure with respect to the selection, purchase, sale, and use of course materials.”  

For the CSU, this means adopting textbooks and providing information to students by the day registration opens in late October (for more information you can refer to the CSU HEOA Frequently Asked Questions page). In order to meet this requirement on our campus, the due date for Spring 2021 course materials submissions to the Wildcat Store will be October 16th, 2020. Faculty’s contribution in this effort can really have a tremendous impact on students at the time they register for classes and plan the cost of their education for Spring 2021, so we want to encourage all instructors to make a decision about their chosen textbook and course material by the October 16th deadline. 

In order to facilitate this process, the bookstore has set up Follett Discover, which you can access directly from Blackboard. After logging into Blackboard, click on the “Launch Follett Discover” button (located after your list of courses, at the bottom on the left hand side) and you will be taken to a page that will ask you to select your role (faculty).  

  • From the home page, you can use the search tools to find the specific term, department, course, and section you want to “Adopt” for.   
  • If you know the ISBN, just enter that in the box for each section and click “Adopt”.   
  • After this, the selection will be sent to the Wildcat Store automatically for ordering and after that to the student website.   
  • You can also search for the ISBN by entering the Title, Author, along with any other description into the search bar on the top right. Publishers can have multiple ISBNs for the same title.     
  • If you see a message saying “ISBN is not found,” either click the link to “request materials not found,” or email the Wildcat Store

For other questions, please contact the Wildcat Store

I also want to take this opportunity to promote one more time the Chico Affordable Learning Solution (CAL$) workshop this Friday, October 9th (from 10:00 to 11:30 am), to explore the adoption of open access material. The forum will be held via Zoom. Please visit the Friday Forums page for additional information. This session will be recorded and posted in the FDEV media channel

Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$)

Today’s Tuesday Tip is brought to you by our campus AL$ Coordinators, Edward Roualdes and Beth Shook. 

Chico Affordable Learning Solutions (CAL$) provides resources to faculty regarding affordable course materials, including how to find and adopt quality zero-cost or low-cost textbooks and other materials, or design one’s own Open Educational Resources (OERs).   

CAL$ has been on the Chico State campus since 2013, and originally went by the name Textbook Affordability Project (TAP) until 2018.  The name Chico Affordable Learning Solutions was adopted to better align our campus effort with the Chancellor’s Office program, Affordable Learning Solutions.  In the last four years, CAL$ has helped students save over $800,000. 

From a spring 2019 CAL$ survey on our campus, we estimate that because of high textbook costs 

  • 52% of students go without the required textbook, 
  • 28% of students avoid or drop/withdraw from course, 
  • 55% of students alter their food or housing budget, and 
  • 24% of students feel their grade was negatively impacted. 

CAL$ will lead a Friday Forum on October 9th (from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.), covering the following topics: 

  • Describe CAL$ efforts on campus so far. 
  • Define Zero Cost Course Materials, its context in the state of California, and how to identify and report if your course meets the criteria. 
  • Discuss Open Educational Resources:  What are OER and how do they differ from Open Access materials? What are the many benefits of using OER in the classroom. 
  • Explore some more popular OER repositories: how to find OER materials for your course. 
  • Highlight resources available through the Meriam Library that can be utilized in the classroom, including ebooks. 
  • Bookstore’s new Discover: more easily adopt books, including OER; October 16 deadline 

The forum will be held via Zoom. Please visit the Friday Forums page for additional information. This session will be recorded and posted in the FDEV media channel

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Legacy

This Tuesday Tip was written in collaboration with Legal Studies professors Mahalley Allen and Maitreya Badami.

Before Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union litigating cases advancing gender equality, before she was a federal appellate court judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, and before she became the second woman appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court, she was a professor, first at Rutgers Law School and then at Columbia Law School.

During her early career as a law professor, Ginsburg’s students asked her to teach a seminar on women and the law. Preparing to teach that class and finding there was little in the law about women’s place in the world set Ginsburg on a path to becoming a legal and feminist icon who changed the law in this country, not only for women, but for everyone.

In Our Revolutionary Spirit, a short film celebrating Rutgers’ 250th anniversary, Ginsburg reflected that her students “sparked my interest and aided in charting the course I then pursued. Less than three years after starting the seminar, I was arguing gender discrimination cases before the Supreme Court.” In turn, Ginsburg inspired her students, working tirelessly with them as the first Rutgers Law School faculty advisor for the Women’s Rights Law Reporter, now the country’s oldest law journal focusing on women’s rights. While a professor at Columbia Law School, she invited her students to help prepare legal cases she was litigating on behalf of the ACLU. Since her passing on September 18th, many of her former students have released moving tributes about her influence on their lives.

Professor Ginsburg’s career, and the relationship she had with her students, is a powerful reminder of the importance of both inspiring students through experiential learning and letting students inspire us in return. Some of the very practices she applied in her classes are what we now define as high-impact educational practices. Our profession is one that feeds off this formidable exchange of ideas, experiences, and connections. While her career as a professor might not be what she will mostly be remembered by, we want to pay tribute to her today through the meaningful opportunities she created for her students and the endless impact of her teachings.